© R Blunt 2017-2019. Proudly created with Wix.com

  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon

Early Edwardian Pennies

Group 7

Type 7a (between 1292 and 1296) - Spink 1403; North 1032

The crown on coins of type 7a has very widely spread side-fleurs, and is of the same type as used for coins of groups 5 and 6. The coins of Canterbury and London are easily recognised by a rose on the king’s breast, and double-barred N’s in the legends. The coins of Bury, however, lack these features, and are attributed on the basis of having the same bust, with almond-shaped eyes. The letter S is sometimes of the composite type, last used in group 3.

King’s name: EDW
Mints: Bury, Canterbury, London

Type 7b (between 1292 and 1296) - Spink 1404; North 1033

Type 7b coins have a new crown with a tall central fleur, a hooked left ornament, and side-fleurs that are much less spread than those of 7a. The hair is also longer and bushier, with the individual strands more distinct. London coins alone have a rose on the breast, and double-barred N’s. Those of Canterbury and Durham are attributed on the basis of having the same crown and bust. The letter S is sometimes of the composite type, as in 7a.

King’s name: EDW
Mints: Canterbury, Durham, London

General Note

The true chronological order in which the coins of groups 6 and 7 were struck is not reflected by their labels. Following a paper on Group 7 pence by David Greenhalgh in the British Numismatic Journal (BNJ 59, 1989), Denis Martin (see UKDFD 45058) suggests the true order of types between groups 5 and 8 is 7b-6a2-7a-6a1-6b.