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Early Edwardian Pennies

Group 6

Type 6a1 (between 1292 and 1296) - Spink 1401; North 1030

Coins of type 6a are divided into two varieties, 6a1 and 6a2, the first rare, the second extremely rare. Both varieties continue to use a wide spread antler-like crown like that of group 5, but the lettering is now small. 6a1 has an almost plain initial cross, a large oval face of coarse workmanship, and no contractive marks. Both varieties have almond-shaped pupils to the eyes. The letter A is usually unbarred, N is normal, S is non-composite.

King’s name: EDW
Mints: London only

Type 6a2 (between 1292 and 1296) - Spink 1401; North 1030

Coins of type 6a are divided into two varieties, 6a1 and 6a2, the first rare, the second extremely rare. Both varieties continue to use a wide spread antler-like crown like that of group 5, but the lettering is now small. 6a2 has an initial cross pattée, a face of better style than 6a1, and comma contractive marks. Both varieties have almond-shaped pupils to the eyes. The letter A is usually unbarred, N is normal, S is non-composite. The coin illustrated is a 6a2/5b mule, clearly identifiable by the larger lettering on the reverse.

King’s name: EDW
Mints: London only

Type 6b (between 1292 and 1296) - Spink 1402; North 1031

Coins of type 6b continue to use a wide spread antler-like crown like that of group 5, but the lettering is now small. The bust has sloping shoulders and thick drapery, and there is often a swelling on the breast. Two faces are used, both of which are of good style and have eyes with pellet pupils. The letter A is barred or unbarred, C and E are round, N is normal or double-barred, S is non-composite.

King’s name: EDW, EDWA (very rarely)
Mints: Bury, Canterbury (only known as a 6b/5b mule), Durham, London

6a Note

The labels 6a1 and 6a2 used here follow North in SCBI 39. The original classification by the Fox brothers does not sub-divide 6a.

General Note

The true chronological order in which the coins of groups 6 and 7 were struck is not reflected by their labels. Following a paper on Group 7 pence by David Greenhalgh in the British Numismatic Journal (BNJ 59, 1989), Denis Martin (see UKDFD 45058) suggests the true order of types between groups 5 and 8 is 7b-6a2-7a-6a1-6b.