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Early Edwardian Pennies

Group 4

Type 4a (1282 - 1289) - Spink 1394; North 1023

Coins of type 4a can be divided into four varieties, but the details are so intricate that they are very much the preserve of specialists. The crown varies, but is always trifoliate with outwardly curved side-fleurs. The type is most likely to be confused with 3g, with which, in some cases, it shares the same crown and face. For most purposes, it is best distinguished from type 3g by having large comma contractive marks. The letter A may be barred or unbarred, C and E are round, N is normal, S is always non-composite (thick-waisted).

King’s name: EDW
Mints: Bury, Canterbury, Durham, London

Type 4b (1282 - 1289) - Spink 1395; North 1024

Coins of type 4b have either a square, smiling face or a narrower face with a pointed chin, both of which have new bushy hair. The type is readily identifiable by its crown, which has a broken outer leaf on its right-hand side-fleur. The letter A is barred, C and E are round, N is normal, S is always non-composite (thick-waisted). Contractive marks are commas.

King’s name: EDW
Mints: Bury, Canterbury, Durham, London

Type 4c (1282 - 1289) - Spink 1396; North 1025

Coins of type 4c have a new long face and long bushy hair, but they are most easily recognised by their crown, which is also from a new punch. Between the left ornament and the left side-fleur, the headband has a small but distinct vertical nick in the top edge. The right-hand side-fleur is also distinctive in having a central leaf that turns inwards. The letter A is usually barred, but sometimes unbarred, C and E are round, N is normal, S is always non-composite (thick-waisted). Contractive marks are commas.

King’s name: EDW
Mints: Bury, Canterbury, Durham, London

Type 4d (1282 - 1289) - Spink 1397; North 1026

Coins of type 4d are similar to 4c, but are readily distinguishable by having a pellet at the start of both the obverse and reverse legends. Where the pellet does not occur on one side of the coin, it is likely to be due to muling with type 4c or type 4e, which is quite common. The letter A is usually unbarred, but sometimes barred. C and E are round, N is normal, S is always non-composite (thick-waisted). Contractive marks are commas.

King’s name: EDW
Mints: Canterbury, Durham, London

Type 4e (1282 - 1289) - Spink 1398; North 1027

Most coins of type 4e have a new crown with spread side-fleurs, and hair with a distinctly ropy appearance, but a few early coins have the same crown and hair as 4d. Most coins of London and Canterbury are readily identifiable by having three pellets on the king’s breast, and a pellet in the reverse legend before LON and TOR. However, the coins of Bury and Durham have no pellets on either side, and occasionally London and Canterbury coins have two, one or no pellets on the breast. The letter A is unbarred, C and E are round, N is normal, S is always non-composite (thick-waisted). Contractive marks are commas.

King’s name: EDW
Mints: Bury, Canterbury, Durham, London