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Early Edwardian Pennies

Group 10 (secondary phase)

Type 10cf1 (1305 - 1306) - Spink 1410; North 1040

Coins of type 10cf1, and all subsequent issues, are classified primarily by the form of their crown. The central fleur of the 10cf1 crown is shaped like a battle-axe, the side-fleurs are wedge-shaped, and the ornaments are spearheads. The coins have a serpentine S, and the letter R is of the stub-tailed type first used for 10ab6. Early ‘trial’ legends of 10cf1 abbreviate the king’s name to EDWAR and shorten ANGL to ANG, but EDWA was the form adopted, and it persisted on the vast majority of coins for the remainder of the group.

King’s name: EDWA, EDWAR (early trial legends only)
Mints: Bury, Canterbury, Durham, London

Type 10cf2 (1306 - 1307) - Spink 1411; North 1041

Coins of type 10cf2 are classified primarily by the form of their crown. The 10cf2 crown has a spread, well formed, low central fleur, side-fleurs with a bilobed appearance, and vestigial ornaments. Earlier coins of this type are designated 10cf2a, later ones, on which the left-hand ornament is missing, are designated 10cf2b. During this issue, some of the letters develop flaws. The E progressively breaks at its base, and the upright of the H becomes pointed at the bottom, while the tip of the tail disappears. The illustrated coin is of type 10cf2b.

King’s name: EDWA
Mints: Bury, Canterbury, Durham, London

Type 10cf3 (1307 - 1309) - Spink 1412; North 1042/1-2

Coins of type 10cf3 are classified primarily by the form of their crown. The 10cf3 crown has a tall central fleur, the left leaf of which is usually damaged. The ornaments are arrowheads, the left-hand one of which lacks its left barb and thus appears to incline to the right. Early coins of this type (designated 10cf3a) have the broken lettering of 10cf2. Later coins (designated 10cf3b) have new lettering with a C of rounder form and an H with out-turned tail. The crown of 10cf3 is used again for coins of type 10cf6 and 11d. The illustrated coin is of type 10cf3a.

King’s name: EDWA, EDWAR (rarely)
Mints: Bury, Canterbury, Durham, London

Type 10cf4 (1309) - Spink 1413; North 1042/3

Coins of type 10cf4 are classified primarily by the form of their crown. The 10cf4 crown is similar to that of 10cf3, but can be distinguished by a lower, more symmetrical central fleur, and a right-hand fleur with a rounded, hooked leaf that resembles a walking-stick handle. The left-hand arrowhead ornament, like that of 10cf3, lacks its barb and thus appears to incline to the right.

King’s name: EDWA
Mints: Bury, Canterbury, Durham, London

Type 10cf5 (1309 - 1310) - Spink 1414; North 1043/1

Coins of type 10cf5 are classified primarily by the form of their crown. The 10cf5 crown is taller than others in the group, and can readily be distinguished from them by having a left-hand arrowhead ornament that inclines to the left. The left–hand side fleur breaks up during the issue, and is later recut, so its form varies considerably. Early coins, with the undamaged hook-shaped side-fleur are designated 10cf5a1. Later coins, with the broken side-fleur are designated 10cf5a2. Coins on which the side-fleur are recut are designated 10cf5b.

King’s name: EDWA
Mints: Bury, Canterbury, Durham, London

Type 10cf6 (1310) - Spink -; North 1043/2

Coins of type 10cf6 have the crown of type 10cf3, but a face, hair and lettering similar to those of type 10cf5b. They can be distinguished from coins of 10cf3 by the use of a new very small letter S.

King’s name: EDWA
Mints: Bury, Canterbury, London